Woolwich Dockyard Dry Docks London – August 2013

Author SBmkIII - Last updated: 13.12.2013

I stumbled upon this place whilst walking along the river, It’s small but interesting. And probably photographed to death.

History:

Woolwich Dock-Yard, supposed to be the oldest in the kingdom, has been progressively enlarged from the time of its establishment, and in its present state includes an area of about five furlongs in length by one in breadth, surrounded, save on the river side, by a lofty wall. Within this space are several slips, dry- docks, and mast-ponds; a smith’s shop, with forges and ponderous hammers, moved by steam-power, for making anchors of the largest size, and bolts for ships of greatest burthen, a model-loft, store-houses of various descriptions, a mast-house, sheds for timber, dwellings for the different officers, and other buildings. The landing place, on the wharf, is the point where foreigners of distinction generally disembark on their arrival in this country, and embark when quitting it. The largest ships in the British navy have been built here; in particular, the Sovereign of the Seas, of 176 guns, in the reign of Charles I. ; the ill-fated Royal George; the Invincible, 74; the Venerable, 74; the unfortunate Boyne, 98; in later times, the Lord Nelson, 110; and, recently, the Trafalgar, 120. An additional basin, of capacious size, has been recently added to this establishment, and a manufactory for the formation, fitting, and repairing of the engines of the different steam vessels belonging to the British navy. A considerable space is here appropriated to the reception of anchors, some of which are of the largest size, weighing 45 cwt. The offices of the establishment occupy a neat building opposite the principal entrance, on right of which is the Dock Yard Police Office, where visiters having entered their name and address in a book kept for the purpose, are then permitted to view the Yard, but must quit it an hour before the artificers leave work. An order from the Admiralty will alone entitle the visiter to inspect the interior of the different departments. (Mogg’s New Picture of London and Visitor’s Guide to it Sights, 1844)

Now used as a fishing pond.

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1 comment

#1QuintenNovember 11, 2014, 4:29 pm

Thanks for sharing !

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