Tyne Shipyard

Author mrdistopia - Last updated: 09.06.2012

I have had my eye on this place for a while but, by the time I got around to attempting it the demo crew were in ripping it down. Now those guys have left the site is smaller but large sections remain intact (depending on your definition of intact).I was joined on this jaunt by CommunistCat who I want to thank for his site info and his company on a long-overdue explore.

History Bumf: The shipyard was built in 1853 by Hebburn shipbuilders Andrew Leslie & Co. Andrew retired from the company in ’86 and the new manager merged the company with RW Hawthorne – renowned engineers famed for building marine engines as well as a large number of locamotives (second only to Stephenson). The business then comprised of two subsiduaries representing each initial specialism. The shipbuilders eventually became part of Swan Hunter and Tyne Shipbuilders Ltd in ’68 wheras the engine-builders half became part of British Shipbuilders in ’77 and subsequently, Clarke Hawthorne in ’79. The yard built a host of military and trading ships over it’s lifetime before closing it’s doors in 2001 since which time it has been vacant.

There was recently a fire destroying a large area of the reception offices and the tyne-facing heavy engineering section has niw been recuded to rubble. What remains are the 4 storeys of office buildings. These are now in a very bad state due to scrap thieves and vandals. I really wish I was able to see this place before it was so badly damaged. That said, it’s interesting to see what little artifacts of the yard’s former life still remain.

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A concrete bunker away from the main offices and yard.

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Pipe-porn! Everything here is unsafe but it’s nice to see a sign every now and again.

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Very sad state!

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Bridge of death

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Yes, since you ask, that is hospital waste. Fucking shocking what some people get away with dumping. Be VERY careful what you touch in this place. You were warned!

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Detailed financial records dating back years…dumped in a pile. The sensitivity level of some of the ‘litter’ is astounding. Guessing data-protection was not a big concern once they shut up shop.

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Brick-a-brack

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Corridoor

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Fire damage

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View from fire escape

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We actually found a piece of railing the thieves missed. Only a metre long but I bet its gone in a week now I have said that knowing them lot.

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Taken from the stupidly precarious rusted roof-overhang platform

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The precarious platform.

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Sitting on the roof taking in the amazing view of they river this place has.

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More fire damage

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What was a revolving door…once upon a time.

Right that’s it. Hope you enjoyed an update on a well-explored (ok, and well-trashed) site.

MrD

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