The Big Mill

Author Axle - Last updated: 02.02.2013

Middletown Paper Board, 600,000 square feet of abandoned mystery. I have been unable to find anything concrete when it comes to the history of the place. All I know is that the older section (which we gained entrance to) is at least 100 years old based on architecture. We never made it to the newer half of the building as the access point was sealed rather nicely.

This was the first time that we know of any one making it inside this place. It is currently owned by a demolition company.

I slowly drove my car around the perimeter of the place, following the streets and my GPS. It was late morning on Sunday, so anyone who had gone to church would either still be there or starting to arrive home so a single Ontario plated Cavalier would not really be of concern. The place was big, that was sure, fences surrounded most of it, overgrown and empty parking lots.

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The whole place seemed well sealed, there were some gates we could possibly fit under but then no obvious signs of entrance into the building without some serious breaches. Also the proximity of other businesses and homes made it just a touch more risky. And it’s a personal goal of mine to stay out of the US Justice system (And hospital system for that matter).

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A possible entrance was spotting, slightly out of the way, and still behind a fairly tall fence but in an ally, so we only had backyards to deal with, and again hopefully no one was paying too much attention to our little band. We met up with the other two folks who would make up the small group ‘scouting’ this location, leaving our cars at the back of a parking lot of a nearby Dollar General and struck out on foot.

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Trap was the first one over the fence while the rest of us loitered to see if the entrance Yeya had spotted from the car was good, a text message said it was. The rest of us not being as agile as Trap pulled back a fence which had already been neatly clipped upon our arrival (so maybe we weren’t the first ones inside) and made a beeline for the loading docks.

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It was pretty dark inside and the batteries in my flashlight were dying so it took a bit for my eyes to become accustomed to the dark, I spotted light up ahead and watching my step moved towards it. The place was old and we were obviously moving through the older section. Then we got into the main areas and were blown away by the size and age of the place. It was obvious that some demolition and equipment removal had been done or was ongoing, we’d have to watch ourselves if as to not disturb anything big that could trip people off that we had been inside.

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With the help of smart phones we found ourselves at the choke point, the area that connected the older section which we had just spent a good hour or so crawling around in all the way to the foundations, only to find ourselves locked out, a garage door, which had been latched, and the chain to pull it up shoved through a door jam, and the door itself wedged and locked shut…from the other side. A lone red Colman cooler sat in an empty warehouse on the other side. We called it a day and headed to meet up with the Harding-Jones people for lunch at a local Wendy’s.

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