Battersea Power Station Permission Visit part 2

Author oldskool - Last updated: 07.06.2013

Battersea Power Station

Water system
Water is essential to a thermal power station, as water is heated to create steam to turn the steam turbines. Water cycled through Battersea Power Station’s systems was taken from the River Thames, upon whose banks it had been built. The station would extract an average of 1 545 700 000 L (340,000,000 Imperial gallons) of water from the river each day. Once the water had been through the station’s systems, the water was cooled and discharged back into the river.
After the end of the Second World War, the London Power Company took the opportunity to use the waste heat of the water from the power station to implement a district heating scheme (now better known as "cogeneration"). The system benefited some 10,000 people by providing hot water and central heating to newly-redeveloped areas within Pimlico, on the opposite side of the river.

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Scrubbers
The reduction of sulphur emissions had been an important factor since the station was in the design stages, as it was one of the main worries of those who protested the construction of the station. The London Power Company began developing an experimental technique for washing the flue gases in 1925. It used water and alkaline sprays over scrubbers of steel and timber in the flue ducts. The gases were subject to continuous washing, and with the presence of the catalyst iron oxide,sulphur dioxide was converted into sulphuric acid. Battersea Power Station was one of the first commercial applications of this technique in the world. This method of washing was stopped in the B Station in the 1960s, when it was discovered that the discharge of these products into the Thames was more harmful to the river than the gases would be to the atmosphere.

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Closure and redevelopment
Closure

The station in November 1986, a couple of years after ceasing to generate electricity
The fact that the station’s output continued to fall, coupled with increased operating costs, such as flue gas cleaning, led to Battersea’s demise. On 17 March 1975, the A Station was closed after being in operation for 40 years. By this time the A Station was co-firing oil and its generating capacity had reduced to 228 MW.
Three years after the closure of the A Station, rumours began to circulate that the B Station would soon follow. A campaign was then launched to try to save the building as part of the national heritage. As a result the station was declared a heritage site in 1980, when the Secretary of State for the Environment, Michael Heseltine, awarded the building Grade II listed status. (This was upgraded to Grade II* listed in 2007.) On 31 October 1983 production of electricity at Station B also ended, after nearly 30 years of operation. By then the B Station’s generating capacity had fallen to 146 MW. The closure of the two stations was put down largely to the generating equipment becoming outdated, and the preferred choice of fuel for electricity generation shifting from coal toward oil, gas and nuclear power. Since the station ceased generating electricity, there have been numerous proposals and attempts to redevelop the site.

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2012 redevelopment plans

The power station’s 39-acre site received much interest, with many submitting bids due to its large proximity in the 2012 sale.

Any potential buyer were required to preserve the station’s Grade II* listed – four iconic chimneys and wash towers.
Following the failure of the REO bid to develop the site, in February 2012, Battersea Power Station was put up for sale on the open market for the first time in its history. The sale was conducted by commercial estate agent Knight Frank on behalf of the site’s creditors. In May 2012, several bids were received for the landmark site, which was put on the market after Nama and Lloyds Banking Group called in loans held by Treasury Holdings’ Real Estate Opportunities (REO). Bids were received from Chelsea F.C. with other interested parties including a Malaysian interest, SP Setia, London & Regional, a company owned by the London-based Livingstone brothers and housebuilder Berkeley. If sold, the new owner would have to pay £500 million for the power station, including £325 million to cover the debts held by Nama and Lloyds, and a £100 million contribution to the northern line extension. If the sale is unsuccessful, the agent would have a duty to maintain and preserve the site in line with its listed status.
On 7 June 2012, Knight Frank announced that administrators Ernst & Young had entered into an exclusive agreement with Malaysian developers SP Setia and Sime Darby, who were given 28 days to conduct due diligence and agree the final terms of the deal. Completion of the sale to the Malaysian consortium took place in September 2012.] The redevelopment of the site will use the existing Vinoly master plan which intends to position the Power Station as the central focus of the regenerated 40 acre site, housing a blend or shops, cafes, restaurants, art and leisure facilities, office space and residential accommodation. The plan includes the restoration of the historic Power Station itself, the creation of a new riverside park to the north of the Power Station and the creation of a new High Street which is designed to link the future entrance to Battersea Power Station tube station with the Power Station. The redevelopment is hoped to bring about the addition of over 400m[clarification needed] to the existing riverside walk and facilitate access directly from the Power Station to Battersea Park and Chelsea Bridge. Restoration of the Grade 2* listed Power Station is an early priority in the development. Work is due to commence in 2013 and plans include the restoration the art deco structure internally and externally, reconstruction of the chimneys, and refurbishment of the historic cranes and jetty as a new river taxi stop. The plan includes over 800 homes of varying sizes, and sales of residential apartments in Phase 1 of the redevelopment began in January 2013 with around 75% of townhouses and apartments being sold within four days. Construction work on Phase 1, called Circus West, is due to commence in 2013 alongside work on the Power Station. The full redevelopment consists of seven main phases, some of which are planned to run concurrently. Phase 1 is due to complete in 2016/17 with the Northern Line extension and requisite new Battersea Power Station terminal anticipated to complete in 2019.
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Battersea Power Station in popular culture
Battersea Power Station has become an iconic structure, being featured in or used as a shooting location for many films, television programmes, music videos and video games. One of the station’s earliest appearances on film was in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1936 film Sabotage, which shows the station before the construction of the B station. The interior of the A station’s control room was used for the "Find The Fish" segment of Monty Python’s 1983 film The Meaning of Life.
The iconic station appears in three scenes in Val Guest’s 1961 sci-fi/ comedy romance "The Day the Earth Caught Fire", most notably in a rear screen projected tableaux where a dense fog (created by effects expert/ matte painter Lester Bowie) engulfs the Thames.
It also appears during the first daylight attack on London sequence in the 1969 movie, Battle of Britain, in the movie as in real life used as a navigational landmark by the attacking Luftwaffe bombers. More recently in October 2007, the power station was used as a filming location for the Batman movie, The Dark Knight. The station’s stripped, empty interior was used as a setting for a burnt out warehouse.
The station has appeared numerous times in the long-running British science fiction series Doctor Who. It appeared briefly in the episode The Dalek Invasion of Earth in 1964, which saw the station in the 22nd century with two chimneys demolished, and a nearby nuclear reactor dome. It appeared again in the 2006 Doctor Who episodes "Rise of the Cybermen" and "The Age of Steel" as the base to which Londoners are drawn to be converted into Cybermen. It also appeared in the episode "A Scandal in Belgravia" from the BBC series Sherlock. In 2011 Jpop singer Ayumi Hamasaki filmed a music video for her album Party Queen at Battersea Power Station. The rock band, Muse, will play a live show at the Battersea Power Station on 16 September, the eve of the release of the band’s sixth studio album, The 2nd Law, which will be broadcast in cinemas throughout England.

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Animals
The Battersea Power Station Community Group think one of the main reasons for the power station’s worldwide recognition is that it has appeared on the cover of Pink Floyd’s 1977 album, Animals, on which it was photographed with the group’sinflatable pink pig floating above it. The photographs were taken in early December 1976 and the inflatable pig was made by the German company Ballon Fabrik and Australian artist Jeffrey Shaw. The inflatable pig was tethered to one of the power station’s southern chimneys, but broke loose from its moorings and, to the astonishment of pilots in approaching planes, rose into the flight path of Heathrow Airport. Police helicopters tracked its course, until it landed in Kent. Video footage of the photoshoot was used in the promotional video for the song "Pigs on the Wing". The album was officially launched at an event at the power station. The image has since been parodied many times. A 3D reproduction of the image was used in one of the introduction films for the opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games in London.
In recent years, the station has been used for various sporting, cultural and political events. Since 22 August 2009, the station has been used as a venue on the Red Bull X-Fighters season. On 13 April 2010 the station was used as the venue for the launch of the Conservative Party’s 2010 general election manifesto. Between 6 and 7 May 2010, the station site was used by Sky News in their coverage of the election. The site has also been used as a venue in the popular Colin McRaeseries of video games, featuring in Dirt 2 as a selection of Rallycross tracks and Dirt 3 and Dirt Showdown as explorable joyride areas.
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Battersea by night by Paul Morris aka Mr.Oldskool.., on Flickr

Thanks for looking Oldskool

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