Exploring the Royal Hospital Haslar, UK

Author sophos9 - Last updated: 10.01.2012

So this is the first of my backdated reports that I’ll be getting up now that I’ve joined here. What better place to start than Haslar? With a reputation for being pretty difficult with security who actually do a good job, little vandalism/graf (if at all) and being situated between anactive military base and a prison, only a handful of reports can be found across various forums. As a result, of course I wanted to get in! My chance finally came when myself and my usual partner in crime decided to have a scout when on our way to somewhere else…

Visited here with the usual suspects Matt, Oli and Rob (who I don’t think are on this forum though) on a brilliant sunny day. I’m sure many people are familiar with Haslar but here’s some information for those who may not be.

From http://www.theyworkforyou.com/debate…-03-20b.1207.0:

The Haslar site was bought in 1745. It is a glorious 55-acre site overlooking the mouth of Portsmouth harbour, and it became the first purpose-built hospital for the Royal Navy. It was opened in 1754 and took some 1,800 patients. Its distinctive high walls were there to prevent the patients from escaping should they wish to do so, having been press-ganged into the Navy initially. It is historically very interesting. The expression “up the creek” refers to Haslar creek, which is not a good place to be. It was for years the main home of the Royal Naval Medical Service, but following changes it eventually became the only military hospital in the United Kingdom, and was renamed the Royal Hospital Haslar. That was the position on 10 December 1998. On that date, the Government announced they were proposing that the military forces withdraw from Haslar, and it was stated that the hospital would close in about two years. In fact, some 10 years later the Royal Hospital Haslar [was] still there.

And a nice little tidbit of information for those among us who, like me, are Doctor Who fans (lifted from http://www.qaranc.co.uk/haslarroyalnavalhospital.php):

In his audience with radio broadcast called An Hour with Jon Pertwee the actor who played Worzel Gummidge, Dr Who and Chief Petty Officer Pertwee in the Navy Lark talks about his time at Haslar Hospital. He was hit by shrapnel during a bombing at Portsmouth and was thought to be dead. The Officers Mess larder fridge was being used as a temporarily mortuary and Jon Pertwee was put in there and woke up later when part of a body fell on him. He surprised the guard when he banged on the temporarily morgue and was taken to Haslar to recover from his wounds.

In total there were three visits made in quick succession, each time with one or two different friends who’d been interested in this place for a while. The first two went down with no problems, but the third was more eventful (I’ll post about that in a reply, to break it up a bit). With such a wealth of details to see here it’s hard to narrow down the amount of photos to post. The shots I’ve included are mostly from the first visit and some from the second.

1. View from the roof of the sunrise over Haslar on the first visit. Perfect start to a perfect exploring day. Myself and Matt in particular were very excited to finally be here.

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2. Morning sunlight streaming in.

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3. Looking out into one of the courtyard areas.

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4. Lots of nice signage around this place.

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5.

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7. Still lots of nice equipment around too, including one certain famous item which will be shown later on…

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8.

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10. … although sadly things like (most) beds and some other easily-removable things aren’t around anymore.

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11.

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14. We climbed the stairs…

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15. … to the roof walkways…

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16. … then descended to the service tunnels. Lights were on (and some motion-activated) which was a bit concerning, but we pressed forward and found no reason to worry.

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17.

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19. We found strange pictures on the walls in one part of the tunnels.

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20.

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21. Nice big wooden doors in the central block – one of the older parts of the building if I’m not mistaken.

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22. The famous emblem! No better way to end the day than in A&E and the eye clinic where we suspected the MRI scanner lay in wait nearby, having searched all over the rest of the building for it to no avail.

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23.

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24. Finally… the grail of Haslar! We’d found the MRI scanner. Obviously I had to get inside.

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25. … Although it looks like a portal’s opened up in it and there’s now an inter-dimensional creature coming through.

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Oli loves that mask…

Hope you enjoyed this!

3 comments

#1ccrJuly 25, 2012, 10:12 pm

I worked in Haslar for 5 years, first 2 as a temp and then 3 years with the NHS. It was a fantastic place to work. I was a ward clerk, physio reception then in Ortho. I loved that building. Once I had to go into the catacombs and apparently it was where some of the Leprasy patients were kept, it was extremely scarey. The furnice popped and my legs were up those stairs like Lynford Christie, no way I was staying down there not even with my boss. It was said that the kids ward was haunted – and I am convinced it was.
Happy Days, it is very sad that such a historic building should be left to go to ruins.

#2ChazDecember 7, 2012, 11:11 pm

I was stationed there from 1979 to 1980 i could tell you a lot about the museum. VERY SCARY

#3PompeyianNovember 5, 2013, 2:38 am

I spent a lot of time in Haslar, visiting my parents who between them spent several years in there (separately, that is). Brings back a lot of memories, good and bad. I also sent a link to my parents, who appreciated it a lot.

Thanks!

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